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Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned from Online Dating. Conquering the dating market — from an economist’s point of view. After more than twenty years, economist Paul Oyer found himself back on the dating scene — but what a difference a few years made. Dating was now dominated by sites like blogger.com, eHarmony, and OkCupid AdFind Free Dating Sites That Are Fun & Easy-to-Use. Date Attractive Singles! Dating Has Never Been Easier! All The Options are Waiting For You in One Place AdCompare Dating Sites with Genuine Profiles. Meet Local Singles & Find Your Match. Online Dating Has Already Changed The Lives of Millions of People. Join TodayMillions of Users · Dating Sites Comparison · Customer Support · Meet Singles Like You ... read more

The application of economic principles to something everyone has experience with—dating—will help readers figure out how to behave in any market. Paul Oyer is the Fred H. Merrill Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He lives in Stanford, California, with his two children and his flat-coated retriever, Josie. About the author Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations.

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I enjoyed the comparisons between dating sites and economic concepts like "thick markets" and could be useful if you looking for dates this way. Probably not broadly useful given his viewpoint of the world, as he touches on motivations of groups he's prejudging by identity politics viewpoints - makes sense given macro thinking that economists employ which is always wrong prejudging is unreliable for identity politics, and virtually useless when looking at an individual , sometimes offensively he appears to have the downed a few glasses of "women are wonderful" Kool-aid.

Good read. This book is fun, entertaining and very easy to read. I highly recommend it to anyone who is currently or has previously attempted to find relationships using online dating sites or if you enjoy applying economic concepts to every day life.

The author uses a number of economic concepts and applies them to the realities of online dating. I will apply many of the ideas, which originate both from research and first-hand experience, in using online dating sites.

The author also uses quite a bit of self-deprecating humor in describing his own experiences. I did feel like there was a few things missing from the book, though.

First of all, it is harder to apply all of the concepts to something as superficial as online dating, especially when using an app like Tinder.

He also seemed to be applying these ideas to paid user sites especially Match. com and comparing them to other avenues to meet people. Essentially, it's not really a "how to" book, as it is an enjoyable read on the economics of every day life.

See all reviews. Top reviews from other countries. Translate all reviews to English. First chapter is very interesting - hooked me in. Was really looking forward to dig into this book - but the more I read, the less I enjoyed it. There are so many fascinating insights you could make around dating and economics - so why is the author mainly focusing around the two most well known facts in the history of dating?

Women look for wealth and men look for beauty. So much time is spent dwelling on this that you just wish someone would give you a fake call so you could ditch the book and do a runner. The author's fascination with the idea of signalling is terrible - having one or two special emails to send only those you really really want to meet, that be for a date or for a job interview does not seem very thought through.

Consider a job applicant who sends applications a month to find a new job - and now gets the option to mark 2 of these with a signal so the employer knows they really want to work there. If the applicant isn't right, the signal doesn't matter - the employer isn't going to award anyone an interview just because there's a signal adding weight to the intent. Now there will be 18 companies out there with jobs that could have be ideal for this candidate - if it wasn't for the fact that they are now armed with the knowledge that they aren't his first priority.

The self deprecating humor fast becomes REALLY annoying and you wonder if the editor was on vacation before letting this book off to the press - it could have been very well written if cut down in half. Only good thing about the book is that the author in the end reveals that he did indeed find love - although not by following the advice given in his book Libro come da descrizione, spedizione veloce giorno dopo , arrivato in una settimana in Italia.

Report abuse Translate review to English. I discovered this book because my fiancee listens to Freakonomics radio and heard a hilarious fascinating interview with the writer. It has a lot of the same kind of information as Naked Economics and Freakonomics so it was the authors comic writing style that made it impossible for me to stop reading.

I give this book 4 stars instead of five because while I think that it is a creative way to approach the subject matter there are things that a more statistical approach to relationships does not cover.

For example, I always find a person's attitude about money and work reveals more about them than how much they do or do not have. I continuously find that the economic dilemmas of educated people in underpaid work is not considered in the correlations between earnings and educational achievements as I find myself in a network of teachers and artists.

And I also thought the book disregarded women who do not expect their mates to earn more money. Or that different people find different things to be attractive. Or that at the end of the day fields like economics can help us understand the patterns that contribute to who we are but there is something about romantic love and sexual attraction that is a mystery.

This is a pretty good economics book, explaining the concepts using online dating as case studies, as well as other things. I'd say by the end of the book I knew a couple more of these concepts that I didn't know before, signaling is one example.

However one problem I had with this book is one that I have with economics as a whole is that the models are too simplistic. She probably didn't reject you because you didn't signal hard enough, but I'm afraid one could take that away as one of the things taught in this book. Also, the book was rather dull, I found. One person found this helpful. If you're a bad shopper, you might over-pay for melons at the grocery store or get taken by a car dealer.

If you're a bad "shopper" in a so-called matching market, you might end up with a spouse you can't stand or who can't stand you and a job you hate. In short, the stakes in matching markets are high. To make matters worse, these markets are notoriously complicated: you have to both choose and be chosen and you often don't know what you are "buying" until it's too late.

You have to make decisions on the basis of very incomplete information. Fortunately, with this book, you have Stanford Professor and economist Paul Oyer as your guide. He's an expert on matching markets, but rather than write about them abstractly, he uses his own experiences re-joining the dating market after a long absence as extended, instructive example. He illustrates key economic concepts simply and clearly. The book is an easy read but it is filled with ideas.

It's also funny and personalthe author's warmth and self-deprecating sense of humor come through. Your recently viewed items and featured recommendations. But Oyer had a secret weapon: economics. It turns out that dating sites are no different than the markets Oyer had spent a lifetime studying. com, eBay, and other sites where individuals come together to find a match gave Oyer startling insight into the modern dating scene.

The arcane language of economics—search, signaling, adverse selection, cheap talk, statistical discrimination, thick markets, and network externalities—provides a useful guide to finding a mate. Using the ideas that are central to how markets and economics and dating work, Oyer shows how you can apply these ideas to take advantage of the economics in everyday life, all around you, all the time.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published January 7th by Harvard Business Review Press first published December 17th More Details Axiom Business Book Award for Econonics Silver Other Editions 1. All Editions. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating.

Jun 16, Emma Deplores Goodreads Censorship rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , economics , 2-stars-and-a-half. But it is also shallow. It does explain some concepts from microeconomics, using examples from online dating as a starting point before seguing into other examples. Meanwhile, the author seems to have this relentless desire to put a positive spin on everything, as if he feels that economics sometimes leading to bad results would make the field of study somehow less worthwhile.

flag 6 likes · Like · see review. Jun 22, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: , nonfiction , economics , on-shelf-at-library-so-why-not. It seems like everyone is a little disappointed with this book: if they wanted dating advice, it had too much economics; if they wanted economics, it had too much goofy discussion of online dating.

I read it impulsively and quickly, with no particular expectations, so I found it diverting enough. Each chapter brings up a concept from economics like signaling and then gives examples of it in online dating and other contexts, like job hunting, buying a car, etc.

The concepts don't seem very adva It seems like everyone is a little disappointed with this book: if they wanted dating advice, it had too much economics; if they wanted economics, it had too much goofy discussion of online dating. The concepts don't seem very advanced and the whole thing is basically a gimmick, but I thought the author was droll and not overestimating his own funniness, so it worked. flag 5 likes · Like · see review. Mar 02, Asher rated it liked it. Is there a genre known as pop economics?

I'd throw Freakonomics into this genre too. Or is that a creation that would make economists cringe? If such a genre exists, Paul Oyer's book would fit nicely. Oyer uses online dating as a framework to explain basic economic principles in an accessible and sometimes fun way. flag 3 likes · Like · see review.

Jul 27, Sheila rated it it was amazing. Genius is not reflected solely in whether a person has a unique idea, in my opinion. Genius is taking a complex concept and relating it to an audience in such a way that they would understand it and remember it. That is the appeal of this book. It is also refreshing that Paul Oyer unabashedly uses his own experiences of online dating to teach us the basics of economics.

The book does not just use online dating as a model, though. Oyer also provides examples with eBay, financial Web sites, and mo Genius is not reflected solely in whether a person has a unique idea, in my opinion. Oyer also provides examples with eBay, financial Web sites, and mostly anything internet related to make his point.

His side comments make this a fun read. While I did notice a few editorial mistakes in the book, this did not detract from the enjoyment of reading it. Now I know that my issue with online dating is that I think it does not maximize my utility, and that being single has placed my in a socioeconomic bubble due to positive assortative mating.

flag 2 likes · Like · see review. Oct 10, Sterling Hardaway rated it liked it. Fun applied economics book, goes over basic-intermediate micro principles. Wouldn't recommend if you want a deep dive or to learn something new about markets, but Oyer's humor and humility towards his personal online dating journey is really great! flag 1 like · Like · see review. May 06, Jitesh Seth rated it liked it. Decent book.

Lots of concepts I kinda knew but in a different light. I actually liked the fact that though the starting point was dating the author went into abilities analogues other than dating for the concept he was discussing. All in all, it feels like an economics professor watching all his peers publish books, and because of FOMO he thinks, "how can I repackage the same economics concepts such that people would want to read it?

Jun 10, Kelly Wagner rated it really liked it Shelves: popular-science , non-fiction. As I am an over-educated person with a graduate degree, I knew most of this already, but Oyer's presentation is breezy, amusing, and clear, and his analogies are funny. As an over-educated person with a graduate degree, I especially enjoyed reading about how much a better education can add to one's dating possibilities, quality of eventual life partner, and lifetime supply of happiness as well as one's job prospects and total income.

Dec 11, John Cena added it. This book was funny and informative at the same time. It tackled topics that could seem unapproachable at first with relative ease and understanding.

It talked about topics like hidden information and a best fit partnership. This book is great for anyone who is looking into learning more about economics. One thing it does well is help explain topics by giving several examples and showing how each part makes it a good example of said topic. It uses online dating a lot I know surprising as examp This book was funny and informative at the same time.

It uses online dating a lot I know surprising as examples for the concepts. It's really funny because I can relate to this book because of the way my brother acts.

He is the equivalent of online dating services in this book. He fit every concept perfectly and is a great example of some of these concepts like signaling and how his use of sarcasm is rare yet powerful.

I just find it funny that everything in our lives can be an example of some bigger principle like my brother in microeconomics. It was a relatively good read with nothing really bad about it. The problem is that it may not do something really wrong but the book does nothing really right and the novelty of online dating connecting to economics begins to seem overused near the end of the book.

flag Like · see review. Jul 18, Sai Teja rated it it was ok. First time I picked up this book, I went in not at all expecting to like it. Come on!! And, to no one's surprise, it was meh. Barely touched upon economics concepts, and kinda tries to fit online dating experiences into these models and concepts to draw conclusions. The conclusions do make sense, even if they seem presumptuous.

But, at the end of the day, how much did I learn about economics? How much did I learn abou online dating? Not all that much in either case, I'm afraid. I drop First time I picked up this book, I went in not at all expecting to like it. I dropped it a chapter in, and returned to slog through and finish it a few months later, and though it did pick up in explaining concepts in a more engaging manner, the original problem of it being too light on both subjects still stood.

So, a decent book, good to kill time and pick up some basic, layman's version of pop-economics. Much more interesting and readable than that Freakonomics shit, though. Gotta go finish that now. Kill me. Wait, no, go kill Jitesh bhai. Oct 31, Brandon Stumpf rated it it was amazing Shelves: math.

Paul Oyer's economics in the dating world book gives an interesting look at the economics in play in the dating market as well as economics in our daily lives. I was interested throughout the entire book, and everything he discussed could be applied to real life.

I found the chapters on Thick Versus Think Markets and Positive Assortative Mating the most interesting.

If you're looking for a book on dating advice, this book offers some, but not much. I'd say this is more of an economists read rath Paul Oyer's economics in the dating world book gives an interesting look at the economics in play in the dating market as well as economics in our daily lives. I'd say this is more of an economists read rather than a potential dater's read believe me, if you're looking for dating advice, there are plenty of videos on YouTube for that.

Even though Chapter 10 had little to do with dating, I really liked his analysis on the evolution of the "traditional" family structure. I'd recommend this to anyone interested in economics or who wants to view dating from an economics perspective.

Mar 09, Nini rated it it was amazing. I recently enjoy more pop economic type of books or podcasts and was delighted to stumble upon this book at my local library. This book is fun to read and very refreshing. And bear in mind, it is more economics books versus online dating advice book. Jan 17, Joe Petsche rated it really liked it. Covered a wide variety of topics related to economics and dating.

Found it amusing, I would have had similar conversations with friends contemplating how stuff works. He backs up his finding with many references. Jun 23, Jake Engelke rated it it was amazing. Very interesting read on how economics is applicable in daily life. The economics concepts were all undergraduate level and not too difficult to understand but still provided good insight on unconventional markets- like the dating market. Nov 02, Wei Jie rated it really liked it.

A book about microeconomics and how those concepts relate to online dating. Title is sort of a clickbait because only each chapter's introduction talks about online dating and the rest were economics theories and link to other markets. Aug 22, Ilana Diamant rated it did not like it. Even though the author is an academic at an Ivy League university no less , this book is full of platitudes, generalizations, and ridiculous metaphors want to date online?

make sure you have an exit strategy much like armies and investors do. May 14, Robin Ver rated it really liked it. Funny, gives loads of examples from different scenarios and each chapter is nicely summarized by the author with a few key takeaways. Jan 30, Nisarg Desai rated it really liked it. Good introduction to some concepts of economics and a depressing reality check.

Jun 04, szymborskalyte rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction-popular. This is more like an intro to microeconomics with a dating flavor. Aug 04, Jebadiah rated it it was ok. Just underwhelming. Sep 05, Steve Gross rated it liked it. Fun, but a little wordy.

Be the first to ask a question about Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating by Paul Oyer.

Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating by Paul Oyer. Dating was now dominated by sites like Match. com, eHarmony, and OkCupid. But Oyer had a secret weapon: economics. It turns out that dating sites are no different than the markets Oyer had spent a lifetime studying.

com, eBay, and other sites where individuals come together to find a match gave Oyer startling insight into the modern dating scene. The arcane language of economics—search, signaling, adverse selection, cheap talk, statistical discrimination, thick markets, and network externalities—provides a useful guide to finding a mate. Using the ideas that are central to how markets and economics and dating work, Oyer shows how you can apply these ideas to take advantage of the economics in everyday life, all around you, all the time.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. Published January 7th by Harvard Business Review Press first published December 17th More Details Axiom Business Book Award for Econonics Silver Other Editions 1. All Editions. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of Everything I Ever Needed to Know about Economics I Learned from Online Dating. Jun 16, Emma Deplores Goodreads Censorship rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , economics , 2-stars-and-a-half. But it is also shallow. It does explain some concepts from microeconomics, using examples from online dating as a starting point before seguing into other examples.

Meanwhile, the author seems to have this relentless desire to put a positive spin on everything, as if he feels that economics sometimes leading to bad results would make the field of study somehow less worthwhile. flag 6 likes · Like · see review. Jun 22, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: , nonfiction , economics , on-shelf-at-library-so-why-not. It seems like everyone is a little disappointed with this book: if they wanted dating advice, it had too much economics; if they wanted economics, it had too much goofy discussion of online dating.

I read it impulsively and quickly, with no particular expectations, so I found it diverting enough. Each chapter brings up a concept from economics like signaling and then gives examples of it in online dating and other contexts, like job hunting, buying a car, etc.

The concepts don't seem very adva It seems like everyone is a little disappointed with this book: if they wanted dating advice, it had too much economics; if they wanted economics, it had too much goofy discussion of online dating. The concepts don't seem very advanced and the whole thing is basically a gimmick, but I thought the author was droll and not overestimating his own funniness, so it worked. flag 5 likes · Like · see review. Mar 02, Asher rated it liked it. Is there a genre known as pop economics?

I'd throw Freakonomics into this genre too. Or is that a creation that would make economists cringe? If such a genre exists, Paul Oyer's book would fit nicely. Oyer uses online dating as a framework to explain basic economic principles in an accessible and sometimes fun way. flag 3 likes · Like · see review. Jul 27, Sheila rated it it was amazing. Genius is not reflected solely in whether a person has a unique idea, in my opinion.

Genius is taking a complex concept and relating it to an audience in such a way that they would understand it and remember it.

That is the appeal of this book. It is also refreshing that Paul Oyer unabashedly uses his own experiences of online dating to teach us the basics of economics. The book does not just use online dating as a model, though. Oyer also provides examples with eBay, financial Web sites, and mo Genius is not reflected solely in whether a person has a unique idea, in my opinion. Oyer also provides examples with eBay, financial Web sites, and mostly anything internet related to make his point.

His side comments make this a fun read. While I did notice a few editorial mistakes in the book, this did not detract from the enjoyment of reading it.

Now I know that my issue with online dating is that I think it does not maximize my utility, and that being single has placed my in a socioeconomic bubble due to positive assortative mating. flag 2 likes · Like · see review.

Oct 10, Sterling Hardaway rated it liked it. Fun applied economics book, goes over basic-intermediate micro principles. Wouldn't recommend if you want a deep dive or to learn something new about markets, but Oyer's humor and humility towards his personal online dating journey is really great! flag 1 like · Like · see review.

May 06, Jitesh Seth rated it liked it. Decent book. Lots of concepts I kinda knew but in a different light. I actually liked the fact that though the starting point was dating the author went into abilities analogues other than dating for the concept he was discussing. All in all, it feels like an economics professor watching all his peers publish books, and because of FOMO he thinks, "how can I repackage the same economics concepts such that people would want to read it?

Jun 10, Kelly Wagner rated it really liked it Shelves: popular-science , non-fiction. As I am an over-educated person with a graduate degree, I knew most of this already, but Oyer's presentation is breezy, amusing, and clear, and his analogies are funny. As an over-educated person with a graduate degree, I especially enjoyed reading about how much a better education can add to one's dating possibilities, quality of eventual life partner, and lifetime supply of happiness as well as one's job prospects and total income.

Dec 11, John Cena added it. This book was funny and informative at the same time. It tackled topics that could seem unapproachable at first with relative ease and understanding. It talked about topics like hidden information and a best fit partnership. This book is great for anyone who is looking into learning more about economics.

One thing it does well is help explain topics by giving several examples and showing how each part makes it a good example of said topic.

It uses online dating a lot I know surprising as examp This book was funny and informative at the same time. It uses online dating a lot I know surprising as examples for the concepts.

It's really funny because I can relate to this book because of the way my brother acts. He is the equivalent of online dating services in this book.

He fit every concept perfectly and is a great example of some of these concepts like signaling and how his use of sarcasm is rare yet powerful. I just find it funny that everything in our lives can be an example of some bigger principle like my brother in microeconomics. It was a relatively good read with nothing really bad about it. The problem is that it may not do something really wrong but the book does nothing really right and the novelty of online dating connecting to economics begins to seem overused near the end of the book.

flag Like · see review. Jul 18, Sai Teja rated it it was ok. First time I picked up this book, I went in not at all expecting to like it.

Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned from Online Dating,See a Problem?

AdCompare Dating Sites with Genuine Profiles. Meet Local Singles & Find Your Match. Online Dating Has Already Changed The Lives of Millions of People. Join TodayMillions of Users · Dating Sites Comparison · Customer Support · Meet Singles Like You Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned from Online Dating. Conquering the dating market — from an economist’s point of view. After more than twenty years, economist Paul Oyer found himself back on the dating scene — but what a difference a few years made. Dating was now dominated by sites like blogger.com, eHarmony, and OkCupid AdFind Free Dating Sites That Are Fun & Easy-to-Use. Date Attractive Singles! Dating Has Never Been Easier! All The Options are Waiting For You in One Place ... read more

Friend Reviews. much like armies and investors do. A book about microeconomics and how those concepts relate to online dating. Economics is not unlike social psychology. Return to skills Want to Read saving….

Very interesting read on how economics is applicable in daily life. As he explains in a new book, he discovered that his academic expertise was entirely relevant to his foray into online dating. Back to top. I'd all i ever know about economics online dating this to anyone interested in economics or who wants to view dating from an economics perspective. He lives in Stanford, California, with his two children and his flat-coated retriever, Josie. The concepts don't seem very adva It seems like everyone is a little disappointed with this book: if they wanted dating advice, it had too much economics; if they wanted economics, it had too much goofy discussion of online dating.

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